I. Frames

Checkpoint (I) focuses on providing titles on each frame to facilitate frame identification and navigation and to ensure that the frames content is available in non-frames capable browsers. See the sections below for specific examples and techniques.

Frames

Examples

Example of a web page with four frames.

Assume that there are four frames in a page. The frame along the top of the page is for the page title and primary navigation bar. The narrow frame (center, left) is to be used for the table of contents. The largest frame (center, right) is where the content of the document chosen from the table of contents will appear. The frame across the bottom of the page is for the copyright and footer information. Each one of these framed pages needs a different title to identify its purpose. The code below shows an example of a correctly identified FRAMESET. Note that for each FRAME SRC a title attribute is used to identify that frame from the other frames.

<FRAMESET ROWS="20%,*,30%">
  <FRAME SRC="f1.htm" title="Title and main navigation bar frame">
  <FRAMESET COLS="20%,*,">
    <FRAME SRC="f2.htm" title="Table of contents frame">
    <FRAME SRC="f3.htm" title="Content viewing frame">
  </FRAMESET>
  <FRAME SRC="f4.htm" title="Copyright and footer information">
</FRAMESET>

No Frames

You should include the <NOFRAMES> tag within the frameset to provide a way of getting your sites content with a browser that cannot display frames.

Example

<NOFRAMES><BODY><P> This page uses frames. Click here to access the <a href="/checkpoints.htm">table of contents</a> which links to table of contents of site.</p></BODY></NOFRAMES>

As you can see, the <NOFRAMES> tag includes the <BODY> tag, which is not used in defining a frameset but would be recognized by a frame-unaware browser. Anything within the <BODY> tag would then be displayed in the browser. Be sure to provide a way for all of the content in your site to be accessed without using the frames.

This page adopted from the Curriculum for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0, Copyright © 2000 W3C (MIT, INRIA, Keio), All Rights Reserved.