Checkpoint A.05

Checkpoint A.05 focuses on providing a text equivalent for audio presentations.

Audio Presentations

When using audio on a web page, you must create a text equivalent of the speech or other audio information necessary for the comprehension of the content of the audio file. If the audio file is synchronized with video, please refer to Checkpoint (B).

Depending on the amount of content different methods of providing a text equivalent may be used.

Example 1

When the text equivalent for an audio presentation can be conveyed in 50 characters or less, an image with alternative text next to the audio presentation will provide the necessary text equivalent. For more information on adding text equivalents to images see Checkpoint A.01.

Sound file: Let's work together for accessibility.Listen to a message from the author.

<a href="work-e.wav"><img src="audio.gif" alt="Sound file: Let's work together for accessibility.">Listen to a message from the author.</a>

Example 2

You are a clever programmer. You have written a script that causes a warning sound, like a "Oh-oh!", to be played if the visitor to your page tries to submit a form before all the required fields have been completed. If you are that clever, please give your program (or script) the ability to write a message to the screen that says something like:

"You have tried to submit an incomplete form. Please complete the required fields."

Example 3

When the text equivalent for the audio presentation cannot be conveyed in 50 characters or less, you must create a text transcript to provide the text equivalent.

<a href="sou082004.mp4">
<img height="10" alt="Listen to audio"
src="http://www.ksmu.org/images/mainindex/audio-icon.gif"></a>
<a href="text.htm">View Text</A>